NE Oregon Arts

A RIVER RUNS THROUGH US: THE ART AND WORDS OF THE LOSTINE


A Gathering Place for the Arts in Wallowa County

 

Puzzle Rick Bombaci Refugia of the Lady Slipper Orchid Robin Coen Cascade, East Fork Lostine River David Jensen River in Time Rick McEwan Headwaters Rick Bombaci Evening Sandbar Rick Bombaci Animate (Breath, Soul, To Give Life) Jennifer Hawkins-Connolly Heather Along The Lostine River David Jensen Keeper of The Lostine Pamela Beach Eagle Cap and Lostine River Cascade David Jensen Lostine River Woman David W. Martin Salmon Woman David W. Martin Guard Duty David Martin Mountain Serenade David Martin Guardians Robin Coen Slice of Light Mary Edwards The Portal Mary Edwards The River Runs Through Us Rick McEwan Where the Lostine River Begins Leslie LeViner Peaks Over The Lostine Joella Arment Lostine Dipper Kathy Bowman Ceramic Plate – Sgraffito Design Cheryl North Coughlan River Side, Lostine Canyon Kathy Bowman Fish Dance – Cuuyem Weecet Jan L. Kirchhoff Paintbrush in the Wallowas Joella Arment Lostine River Gravel Bars Leslie LeViner Wild Blues David Martin Swamp Lake Kelly Reardon Colorful River Maja Shaw Trees Grow Through It Maja Shaw Lostine and Refuge Cameron Keller Scott Lake Creek Cirque David Jensen Bull Trout Mary Edwards Bald Eagle Pair Joella Arment Tranquility at Two Pan Kai Oliver Sky Lake M.C. Reardon One Moment Forever, Hobo Lake Jennifer Hawkins-Connolly Cool Scene Mary Edwards A RIVER RUNS THROUGH US

 

The Wild and Scenic Lostine River is an iconic Oregon landscape. The river begins amid the rugged peaks, placid lakes, and weather-beaten white bark pines of the Eagle Cap Wilderness. Its clear, cold waters follow a glacially-hewn valley for 31 miles to the confluence with the Wallowa River, where it nurtured an important Nez Perce summer encampment. The ridges along its watershed are places of alpine splendor, home to Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, Rocky Mountain goats, and other iconic wildlife. The river harbors bull trout, steelhead and rainbow trout, Chinook salmon, and recently restored Coho salmon, whose first returns occurred in 2018.

This exhibit will portray the entirety of this extraordinary wild watershed and its wild inhabitants, river, forests, and alpine setting, from sources to mouth, ridge-top-to-ridgetop, in words and images. It is the 30th year of the river’s official designation as a Wild River.

There is a book featuring the photography of the exhibit available online here

 

Other Virtual Exhibits – 2019